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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 7, 2018 3:07am-3:57am EST

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the trump administration plans to tighten sanctions. target them to cut off fuel and resources. power north korea's weapons program. they will not simply lift
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sanctions as a reward for talking. the hope is to avoid having north korea use the cover of negotiations, while they continue their weapons program. >> margaret brennan thanks. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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growing up, a lot of people judged me because of the way i look. "i thought all asians were good at math." "you all look the same to me." "no, where are you really from?" "9/11 was your fault." "how do you see out of such small eyes?" "go back to your country." i guess i wish that people knew... we are not all the same. we are not all the same. we are not all the same.
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the northeast is bracing for round two tonight. heavy snow, rain, and wind will move in overnight. amtrak has cutback service. and airlines are waiving change fees. more than 150,000 homes and businesses are still without power after the last storm. demarco morgan is on the massachusetts coast tonight. >> this footage shows the homes at risk after last week's four day northeaster left a gaping hole in the sea wall. >> all that happened within two hours. >> she moved here 35 years ago with her late husband. devastating. nothing you can do. >> 300 homes along the coast are in danger of being washed away with a sea wall built in 1954 as their last defense. >> i think this is a reminder how powerful the seaize.
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>> fire captain. >> we had four high tide cycles tremendous. caused flooding around us. all the way through neighborhood and up the coast. >> you can see here behind me there are huge chunks of concrete missing from the sea wall. up and down the coast. now there is a race against time before the next storm arrives. >> excavators working overtime to try to stop the water from gushing in. >> take a look at the watermark. see how high the floodwaters were earlier this morning. now they have gone down dramatically. again. as residents here brace for round two. jeff. >> demarco morgan in massachusetts. thank you. meteorologist eric fisher following the storm. eric, the storm is different. how bad is it? what's the timing? >> this storm is not quite as potent as what we saw last week. if we didn't have last week, a major nor'easter.
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winter storm warnings out from philadelphia across all of the interior sections of new england as well new york state. some of the same places that saw big snow last week, will see big snow again with this storm system. that rain snow line will be right around the i-95 corridor. races to the north and east throughout the day tomorrow. so our biggest snow amounts will be just outside of 95. we could see a couple feet of snowfall again in new york state. some of the towns, 5 feet of snow in five days. zoom in closer. take a look at cities. new york city, on the edge. 4 to 8 inches of snow. north of the city. over a foot. 5-10. 4-8. boston, 1-3. the snow line west of the state. we are going to see strong wind. again not as intense as last week. jeff, as we saw, a lot of the sea walls, damaged. it won't take as much wind to have an equal impact with the
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storm. >> amazing to think of five feet of snow in five days. thank you, eric fisher. >> new numbers show america's opioid crisis is getting worse. in 45 states. emergency room visits for opioid overdoses rose 30% in a year. dean reynolds has more on this. >> according to centers for disease control, the nation is in the grip of a fast-moving epidemic, for which there are no easy solutions. illinois is one of the hardest hit states with nearly a 66% increase in suspected opioid overdose visits to the er last year. dr. tom scaletta emergency room physician in naperville, illinois where they treated 500 opioid dependent patients last year. >> you see fentanyl, heroin. >> little bit of everything. >> increases in states across the nation are more alarming. wisconsin, up 108%. pennsylvania, 80%. delaware, almost 105% in suspected overdoses, treated in emergency rooms.
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dr. ann shuket acting director of the cdc. >> we saw increases in every geographic region, increases in men and women. increases in all adult age groups.an you hear me? >> according to the cdc, ople ey hour across the u.s. >> the potency and toxicity on the street is very high right and so we think there probably is not an increase in people using drugs, but there is an increase in the danger associated with a single use. >> erin whiner, director of addiction services at lindon oaks. >> 90% of people will relapse in the first year going through rehab. diulbiogical pull is strong. >> do you expect it to get worse? >> but, air little sign the opioid epidemic is slowing down. emergency rooms across the
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of frantic effort to keep the victims alive. jeff. >> dean reynolds, tonight. thank you. up next here, cbs news owhi involved in dangerous mining for key component in smart phones, electric cars and lap tops. later the mayor of a major city resigns. after an affwi yoso why accept itt from your allergy pills? most pills don't finish the job because they don't relieve nasal congestion. flonase allergy relief is different. flonase relieves sneezing, itchy, watery eyes
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(shrieks in terror)nd sno) no, no. the running of the bulldogs? what's not surprising? how much money aleia saved fifteen minutes could save you it is possibly your cell phone or laptop powered by child tonight cbs news investigates the mining of cobalt used in many lithiatha the world's coba from democratic republic of 20% of the dough baltimore is mined by hand often by young . debora patta saw dangerous fst. >> reporter: he has never ben to he has no idea how to read or
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wright. cobalt. >> so you need to make monor your granny? >> yes. these consider lug heavy sacks of cobalt to be washed rivers. and even those too young to day breathing in toxic fumes.e ildr saying nobody under 18 is allowed to work here.thats not . >> we asked these companies if their child mined cobalt i being used in their products. all acknowledged problems with the supply chain, but say they w responsible sourcing guidelines. and in complicated it is to chase child they're already micked up without labels. the market. where it is bought by chinese . and they went back later with a hidden camera.
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when we offered off to sell a truck load of the mineral.mined cobalt. this man told us that the ers rl of the cobalt and sold it mainly om the mining. that market. and have a detailed program to eliminate child labor from their supply chain. but the children, like this one, nothing has changed.every eveni he has earned at the mine. >> before you go to sleep.
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the moment before you fall asleep. please what do you think about? >> school. just a dream for this child. debora patta, cbs news, democrictehers have something t celebrate.
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teachers are ending their strike and getting a raise. meg oliver was at the state capitol when the word came down. [ cheers and applause ] >> it is over between teachers after a nine day strike. they reached a deal for a 5% pay increase for all state employees, not just striking teachers. teachers are celebrating. after nine days and 277,000 students left at home. this strike has motivated other teachers across the country to follow suit, oklahoma teachers, could strike as early as next month. jeff. >> meg oliver in the middle of the celebration. meg, thaou mayor of nashville resigned today pleaded guilty to fell thee theft. this is her mug shot. a rising star in the democratic rty. but in january sunny admitted to an affair with the former head .
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all the while he was racking upv both have agreed to pay tens of thousand back to the city. 50 years after the film, chng car arrived in life. pel v liberty. at the geneva auto show. car. or rotor and propeller can be unfolded it can fly like a gyroa base model price. $400,000. flying out of show rooms, or up next here, chip reid tours the haunted, haunts of america's tenth president.
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fun facts about john tyler. the half of a famous campaign elevated to the presidency death of the chief executive. white house in 1844. and 174 years later, two of his chip reid, met one of them. is grandson of john tyler who was born in the 1790. three generations, president tyler, his son, lion tyler and history of the united states. >> but i am still here.met rris william at president tyler's virginia estate. >> when you tell people that you are the great grandson and your father is the grandson of the tenth president of the united states, do they find it hard to believe?
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>> i find it hard to believe. >> i think it has to do with second wives. >> much younger second wives. here is how it happened. john tyler became president in 141. he had eight children with his first wife who died while he was in office. at 52, he married 22-year-old, julia gardner they had seven children for a total of 15, the most of any president. he was 63 when son lion tyler who born whose first wife also died. lyon, too had a second wife, 75, when harrison was born. president tyler, renovated the house with young julia in mind. >> this is the ballroom. john tyler's wife was, 30 years his younger. and liked to party. >> liked to party. designed for the virginia reel. >> all the rage. william says the house its haunted. >> it is amazing. you can see the pearls coming down. bonnet on top of her head. clearly a young girl. no doubt. >> the ghostly image remained even after being painted over.
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>> president tyler's biggest accomplishment was the annexation of texas. but political ambition was not run in the family. >> you never thought of running for president yourself? >> no. >> you wouldn't want that job? >> no. >> would you want that job? >> no. >> i know better. >> instead of making history, they prefer to preserve it. >> chip reid, cbs news, charles city, virginia. that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday.
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welcome to the "overnight news." i'm don dahler. >> an unexpected break through in the nuclear standoff between the united states and north korea. kim jong-un has agreed to an hiss toreic summit meeting next month, with south korea's president. he also said he is open to negotiations with washington. he also said he is open to negotiations with washington, towards ridding the korean peninsula of nuclear weapons. the white house is skeptical. major garrett reports. top officials from south korea and japan are expected in washington by week's end to discuss possible negotiations. now the white house will not say, if president is open to direct talks with north korea, but that possibility, fanciful, months ago now appears real. >> one way or the other we have to do something, we cannot let that situation fester. we cannot let it happen.
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>> in an oval office meeting with the swedish prime minister, president trump expressed cautious optimism about north korea's apparent willingness to negotiate. >> do you believe the north koreans are prepared to give up their nuclear weapons? >> we're going to see. they seem to be acting positively. i think that their statement and the statements coming out of south korea and north korea have been very positive. that would be a great thing for the world. great thing for the world. so we'll see how it all comes about. >> you sound more optimist ache but this situation? >> i would look to be optimistic. but i think maybe this has gone further than anyone has taken it before. hopefully we will go in the very, very peaceful, beautiful path. we're prepared to go whichever path is necessary. >> following a meeting in pyongyang between kim jong-un and senior south korean officials, south korea said in a statement, that the north expressed its willingness to hold a heartfelt dialogue with the united states on the issues of denuclearization and
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normalizing relations. the statement also said north would halt its nuclear program while negotiations were ongoing. later in a press conference, the president was asked why kim jong-un may have had a change of heart. >> me. no, i think that -- nobody got that. i think that -- that they are but i think they're sincere also because the sanctions and what we are doing with respect to north korea including, you know the great help that we have been given from china, and they can do more. but, the sanctions have been very, very strong. and very biting. >> tough sanctions aside, it's been mr. trump's tough rhetoric that helped stoke fears of a conflict on the korean peninsula. >> they will be met with fire and fury. rocketman is on a suicide mission for himself. >> ian bremer is the president of the euroasia group.
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>> on north korea there is no question that trump has moved the needle from beijing and therefore, now from pyongyang, in a way that neither of the previous administrations democratic pubs would do. president trump first said details would come out this week, that's ben pushed back till next week. he is looking for a way to exempt canada and mexico. the tariff proposal has met fierce resistance from republicans in congress. including house speaker paul ryan. chip reid reports. >> white house press secretary sarah sanders said the president doesn't have to agree with the house speaker. the president is committed to imposing tariffs as a matter of
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national and and fulfill a campaign promise to protect the steel industry. >> president trump doubled down on his pledge to lap steep tari ffs onimports, alarming republi who fear a trade war. that could wipe out economic gains. >> i don't think you have a >> while the president dismissed the predicts. republican l ways to block or scale back the tariffs if the president follows through. >> nobody ever wins trade wars. >> arizona senator jeff flake. >> trade wars are only lost by all involved. and, the president continues to treat trade as a zero sum game. >> in a rare public split. paul ryan any office said they were urging the was to not advance with this plan. >> our country, on trade, has been ripped off by virtually every country in the world. whether it is friend or enemy. everybody. >> the president says the tariffs will help resz cue the steel and aluminum industries. a study released monday
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predicted they would lead to a loss of nearly 150,000 jobs. the proposed tariffs would primarily hit long time u.s. allies, canada, britain, germany, south korea, and japan. the european union has the said it will retaliate. by taxing american imporlts. >> president trump said he would respond by slapping tariffs on car imports from the eu. >> if they want to do something, we'll just tax their cars. if they send in here, like water. >> yesterday was primary day in texas. where a record number of women are seeking public office. jan crawford sat down with four first time female candidates. >> for first time candidates, running for office is a baptism by fire. to be a candidate you blow open your comfort zone. >> being the first, actually running is a lot different. >> julie johnson, and anna maria ramos are democrats running for the legislature. republicans, jen and jamie are running for congress. they all agree. it is time for a different approach to politics. >> people wantsomebed to solve problems and get things done.
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i think that is a characteristic that you hear women running. >> all that is happening is bickering, fighting. we have kids that bicker and fight. we saw that every day. >> ha-ha. >> nearly 500 women are likely running for congress. a new record. and roughly 200 more are exploring bids for statewide offices. nearly 70 are democrats. debbie walsh tracks female candidates at the center for american women in politics. >> we saw this increase start to happen almost immediately after the 2016 presidential election. and i think much of this, has been in response to the election of donald trump. >> for johnson and ramos, hillary clinton's defeat felt personal. >> i was devastated. i was devastated. i didn't immediately decided tie needed to run.
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i just knew i needed to bump it up a notch. >> the women's march was instrumental, march after march of cities all across the country. and, this outpouring, of women, saying, enough is enough. >> the increase in republican women running has been much smaller. blanco and sarver found inspiration in 2016. >> i don't like the tone of the pare. do i step back and wait. or dive in and make it better. i want to stand next to the president. and praise the policies i agree with. governing with conservative principles and call it politics and rhetoric. >> i think our party is forgetting that it is the women. the republican party, has so many, republican women. clubs, everywhere. and they're actually the heartbeat of everything. >> if we sat done and had coffee together. though we are republicans and democrats, we could come up with meaningful solutions. i think that's exactly why -- you're seeing so many women run. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. the mineral cobalt is an
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uh-huh. nobody drinks, 'till this guy sweats. degree advanced protection works up to 100°. but be careful, it won't let you down.
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the mineral cobalt is an essential ingredient in the batteries that power a long list of gadgets from cell phones to lap tops to electric vehicles. half of the world's known cobalt researches are in central africa. it gets dug out by hand. and young kids are often the ones doing t debora patta has the story of one boy whose live revolves around the mine. >> reporter: he has never ben to school.
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he has no idea how to read or write. but he is an expert in washing cobalt. he is one of an estimated 20,000 paid a pittance to produce cobalt. every evening this 11-year-old returns home with $1 or $2 to provide for his family. i have to go to work there he told us. because the my grandma has a bad leg and she can't. >> so you make the money for the family? there is no one to look after her he said, i am the one who helps. it's a common story in the drc. kids need to work to survive. i feel very bad because i can see my friend going to school, he told us. and i am struggling. this really its what children should be doing. every child here has been rescued from a mine and put in a school, receiving a decent
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education. at the good shepherd project, the sister and her colleagues have rescued over 1,000 children from the mines. ♪ ♪ for kids who manage to get here are given a hot meal and break from reality. >> how bad are the conditions in the mines? >> it's horrible. they know that it is very
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we have over 100 orpnsthischool. they have lost their parents. >> some of the children when they ce through accidents.bs. >> this safe haven is funded by international charities including usaid and a global cobalt supplier, the minin after child mine cobalt was expoed in their supply chain, they donated $71,000 to this project and say they have implemented responsible sourcing to be kids again. very difficult. that is where we begin actually. with the children. you know? helping them to begin to think about tomorrow. theromomorrofor has to wait. >> when you go to sleep at night before you go to sleep. the moment before you fall asleep. what do you think about? >> my school. >> school, he answers, simply. just a dream for this child. there is a growing outcry from travelers over so-called resort fees. hidden charges, that jack up the price of the room. anna werner reports. >> you probably go on line and compare hotel prices to get the best deals.
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especially for vacations or during the holidays. what if that deal on a hotel isn't one? >> it was the most expensive hotel room i ever paid for in my life. >> when lauren wolf vacationed in key west last year she knew her $400 hotel room wasn't a bargain. when she arrived at front des sheik learned she would be required to pay a $20 resort fee. >> doesn't seem to make a lot of sense. it's not fair. it is taking advantage of people.
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>> wolf is an attorney. after getting mad she got busy starting a website called kill resort fees to educate others. she found she is not the only one who says they were blindsided by fees. this customer says, we got killed on undisclosed resort fees. didn't know about them until we checked out. another, very disappointed. $25 a day, urban facility fee. i was charged this with no explanation of the ben fits. others complain the services they're getting for so-called, resort fees don't add up. resort fee included two beach chairs. neither a beach nor pool. another guest wrote, if you charge $29 recreation activities
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then they aren't complimentary. district of columbia attorney general its leading an investigation along with attorneys general in 47 states. into a dozen major hotel chains. >> what these lodging companies do they hook the would-be buyer with a lower rate and spring the additional charge on them. >> we found this las vegas hotel charging a room rate of $26. with a resort fee of $34. this san francisco hotel. add a $20 urban facility fee. and this hotel in arizona, listed its resort fee of $50, underneath taxes. >> what's illegal about it, it misleads consumers as to what the actual price of a hotel room is. >> reporter: even properties with a certain famous name make money off resort fees. we found three trump hotels in florida, and las vegas charge resort fees of $35, $20, and $24. for a potential $66,000 in charges per day. the american hotel and lodging association told us, the hotel industry provide guests full disclosure for mandatory resort fees charged up front. and says the hotels want to provide consumer with the best value grouping amenity fees into one cost, following the ftc's guidance. but in january this year, the ftc found, charging resort fees separately without first disclosing the total hotel price, likely harms consumers. and racine says the ftc was working with the states on their investigation. at lest he says, until the trump administration came in. >> the ftc, in a way, has gone dark. and i think to be honest. that has been given some confidence to the hospitality
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industry. perhaps they're going to be able to wait out, or otherwise -- invade the efforts of the 47 states. because the ftc is no longer, our partner. off. >> you are saying the ftc backed off? >> that's the case. >> reporter: backed off he claims during a crucial time in negotiations with the hotel chains. >> we were heading towards, what i thought would be a pretty fair settlement. >> really? >> yep. >> election hit. and then awful a sudden, you know, the hospitality industry sort of dug in against our position. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. i was wondering if an electric toothbrush really cleans better than a manual. and my hygienist says it does but they're not all the same. who knew? i had no idea. so she said, look for one that's shaped like a dental tool with a round brush head. go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rounded brush head surrounds each tooth to gently remove more plaque. and unlike sonicare, oral-b is the only electric toothbrush brand accepted by the american dental association for its effectiveness and safety. my mouth feels so clean. i'll only use an oral-b.
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>> you own a restaurant, it gets voted best in the world. really, best in the world. woyo thl over? madison park in new york city. mo rocca has before/after. if you are skeptical that fine lening is an art. manhattan's 11 madison park. >> from the preparation of the food. to its plating. to the restaurant's decor. no detail is too fine.
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>> everything that we do we try to do on a high leaf. we want to make sure it is really good coffee. best it can be.anwas a bustling brasserie when the business partners took charge in 2006. under their stewardship it and, celebrated. until last spring it was named, the number one restaurant in the world. >> what better time to shut the place down and start all over again. >> in a way it was kind of a beautiful thing. you know it is koontd of like, the unexpected. maybe it's not the smartest thing from a business point of view. you know? closing when you have the most demand. but in a way it's kind of, bad ass too. the dining room was stripped bare and kitchen was gutted. >> hum people will be working in the space? a ballet when everything is in motion.
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>> reporter: and much of the metal, pots, pans, cabinet, countertops, repurposed by artist, dan gel turner. >> m basically. >> into, this solid block that now will be the step into the new restaurant. sort of the idea you have to go through the, through the, past to be in the present. >> it may be new, but this 11 madison park is even more in harmony with the historic metropolitan life building that towers over it. >> well i love what you have done with the place. >> thank you. >> it is even more grand than the old restaurant, memorialized in that step by the entrance. >> i have to say as soon as you come in, it sort of is gotham, has a classic, strong look. >> this is such an historic building. the room its the greatest asset. the architecture, should highlight the architecture. >> artist olympia scarry's windows are bringing new light to the space.
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>> she worked with this amazing glassmaker in zurich, made these painted glasses, that are now, going to be above the entrance. >> painter rita akerman created what looks like a well, smudged chalkboard. >> this painting, redrew the painting there before. and sort of erased it. so the theme, we're at the new beginning. >> but of of course things actually begin back here. in chef daniel hume's new kitchen things hum along with precision.
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>> this is really kind of a dream come true. because i have been here in the kitchen for 11 years. and i kind of in 11 years learned what i want this kitsch tine be where i want my pots to be where i want the stove to be. what we need. >> in this kitchen, hume its at the top of his, game. >> we were able to build a fridge made for the drying of the ducks. one thing that hasn't change add the 11 madison park. it is still a very expensive night out at around $300 a person. about the price of a ticket to a hot broadway show. and a responsibility that hume says he doesn't take lightly. >> anyone who walks through the doors, they may be waited a long time to come here. maybe they saved up for it to come here. and, and they want to have a great experience. and we have the responsibility to hopefully deliver. >> of course you can't improve on number one restaurant in the world. so, if it ain't broke, why fix it? >> there is actually a favorite saying, by an artist, i like very much, his name is william de kooning, one of his quotes is i have to change to stay the
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same.
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six months since the hurricane devastated houston. for most of us the storm is a distant memory. but for people whose lives were shattered by the floods, the destruction is still all too real. meg oliver spoke to some of them. >> the u-haul driving through. >> six months after hurricane harvey flooded houston. christine still drives into some of the hardest hit areas. >> wow, stuffed all right. in here. bed is in here. we have, some coffee tables. >> christine has been collecting donations for families struggling to rebuild after harvey's five feet of rain caused record breaking floods.
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>> do you want to take the groceries in to, in to her name is jenny. off awe jenny johnson lost everything. >> it was, it was the worst experience i ever had. you know the water came up. to my waistline. and i have little babies. >> inside her home, mattresses lie on the floor. insulationed bulges from the frame. and doors are missing. >> you still don't hatch walls. >> no. >> throughout the house. >> right. >> six months later. >> johnson's family received $5,000 from fema. it was enough to fix their roof, and cars so they could drive to work. >> do you think people realize it is still this bad? >> i think people have forgotten about it. >> fema paid $13.1 billion to survivors of harvey. >> have you ever responded to anything like that? >> there has been nothing like this. makes this complex.
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>> fema says it can only do so much. for families without flood insurance it will take years to rebuild. >> you are looking at a government entity to try to make you whole. it's going to be a strong, long, drawn out recovery. >> special mexican soup. >> this woman can't afford flood insurance. she slept in a tent for three months after harvey, and still uses her hose to wash dishes. >> how long have you been cooking out here? >> ooh, since harvey. >> do you think your house will be ready before the next hurricane season? >> maybe by july. >> do you think the rest of the country realizes how bad it is six months after? >> no. no. >> what do you want them to know? >> we need help. texas is not okay. >> with the next hurricane season three months away. the victims are relying on good samaritans like christine to survive. meg oliver, cbs news, houston, texas. that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center, in new york city. i'm don dahler.
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well to day is wednesday march 7th this is a special earl a digs of "eyewitness news" this morning with coverage of the nor'easter hitting our region today good morning i'm jim donovan. i'm rahel solomon. all fill public and archdiocese schools are closed there are other schools and cancellations at bottom of the screen. lets check fourth cast, katie 's off, lauren's here and meisha has traffic. >> it is a party. you brought it with you. >> the griddle, pancakes. >> it is in the house. >> fresh blueberries too. >> yes. >> i'm telling you. >> yes. >> we're looking outside right now, and everything is looking okay, right now. looking very wet. we have snow out there. so lauren, what are we working

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